G3

In the OBGYN world we describe a woman’s pregnancy history in terms of G’s and P’s.  There is an alpha numeric code that tells the story- “GTPAL.”

G stands for gravida. It’s the number of times a woman has physically been pregnant.

T is for term- the number of term pregnancies a woman has had.  Any baby born at 37weeks or after counts here.

P is for preterm births, those babies born after 20 weeks but before 37 weeks.

A is for abortion. This is a medical term, not a political one.  Medically we call any end of pregnancy before 20 weeks an abortion.  It may be spontaneous, aka a miscarriage. It may be elective, aka a termination.  A also includes ectopic pregnancies.

L is for living children.  No further explanation needed.

To make it even more confusing we shorten the the GTPAL to G_P_ _ _ _.  In this instance G still stands for gravida and P stands for para- para meaning the number of births (term or preterm). It might be better to explain by example:

A woman who has had one term living child with no other pregnancies would be a G1P1001 versus a woman who has had one living preterm child would be a G1P0101 versus a woman who has had one miscarriage and no other pregnancies would be a G1P0010.

It can be used to describe a pregnant woman too.  My friend who is pregnant for the first time is expecting twins.  She is currently a G1P0000.  When she has the babies, if she has them at term (fingers crossed) she would be a G1P1002.

Make sense?

So why does this matter?

As of late, I have recently added a new G to my history.

After Mabel I became a G1P0100.

After Felix I became a G2P1101.

I am now a G3P1111.

My loss story continues.  I’m having a very early miscarriage.  So early I barely became attached. But it has still stolen the breath out of me.  Did I take five pregnancy tests just to be sure? Did I figure out my due date? Sure did. Think about maternity leave? Toss around baby names in my mind? Imagine telling Felix he’d be a big brother? Dream of a living sibling for me son? Did I get excited? You bet. So when it turned out to be just a shadow of a pregnancy, a whisper of something I’ve been wanting and trying for since Felix was born, I grieved. I am still grieving. I feel broken in so many ways, untrusting of my body, unsure of my ability to be happy.  I know I will find my way out of this darkness- I have crawled out of deeper holes.  But in the meantime, I will mourn my little whisper…

 

 

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The due date revisited…

One year ago today was Mabel’s due date. Honestly I might not have even remembered it had a friend not mentioned it yesterday. A year ago this day meant so much more. I had already birthed Mabel, but the passing of the day felt like the passing of the time I was supposed to be pregnant. One of the many concrete days that marked the end, reminding me I was not longer pregnant with my baby… the one that died. I knew I would not see March 14 while pregnant. The risk of stillbirth with Down Syndrome gave me the option for early induction, which I would have gladly taken. Then the oligohydramnios diagnosis moved the induction date even earlier- to 37 weeks. Only in my last week of pregnancy di we witch it back to 39 weeks. Mabel has us all humbled, thinking we could actually predict the day she came, when she decided to make her entrance into this world at 36 weeks. So all the planning, the dates, ended up meaning so little.

Last year I was sad on this day. Today I am emotionless. I didn’t even remember. Got me thinking…

Did I not remember the day because now her actual birthday means so much more? Did I not remember the day because I am moving forward (not moving on… I don’t like that term)?   Is this progress? Do I even try to make meaning of my forgetfulness?

Validation at work

“You’re really good at this!” she exclaimed as we finished up her visit. I had just put in a Nexplanon in her arm (a small subdermal form of birth control that lasts 3 years). It’s popularity is growing, mostly in my younger patients, who love the idea of something easy and long acting.

I smiled somewhat sheepishly. “Thanks!”

“No really, I mean it,” she went on, with her teenaged enthusiasm. “You’re so thorough and just really friendly. I’m so glad it was you who did this. You’re really good at your job, you know. It’s so cool, finding something you’re good at.”

Her words were well timed. I often have so many doubts about my place at work. Some days I feel like an empty shell. I smile and say all the encouraging words that I’m supposed to, but then go how and stew over things people say, especially around pregnancy. It doesn’t feel good to be “faking it” all the time. But on a visit like this, it was really easy. I love my teenaged and early 20s patients. I’ve made it known in my practice that I have a special interest in the adolescents, so my staff and fellow colleagues often book patients in that age range with me.   I need these patients right now- they remind me (even without them saying so) that I enjoy parts of my job, that it can be fulfilling and that I can find meaning in it.

“Thanks,” I told her more earnestly. “I sometimes need to hear that. I do love my job sometimes.”

She jumped off the table, her arm neatly bound by the pressure dressing, and I knew she’d be back next year to see me.

A few patients later, I sat in front of one of my prenatal patients. She comes weekly for an injections that helps prevent preterm labor in those who have already had a preterm birth, so I’ve see her frequently. Last time I saw her, she had been struggling terribly with heartburn that made her vomit and caused bad headaches after. She had exhausted all the over-the-counter and lifestyle changes to try to combat her discomfort without any relief. Las time I tried a non-traditional medicine- one for nausea that helps with headaches, though not usually used for heartburn. I told her I was unsure it would work, but worth a try because the safety was well established and her symptoms were non traditional.

Now, two weeks later, I asked how she was doing. She told me the new meds still didn’t help. She had waited to talk to me about it, avoiding the topic at her last visit with a different provider.

“I think it’s time we try a prescription heartburn medication,” I said. I explained how the medication is “category C”- a category given to medications to rate their safety in pregnancy. We usually try to stick to category A and B medications and take category C medications on a case by case basis. In her case, I think its worth the risk (not that there is established risk, simply many of the category C medications there is just not enough information).

“See, this is why she’s my favorite,” she turned her head and was speaking to her husband and brother in law who tagged along to the visit. “She explains everything and really tries to help.” She looked back at me and continued, “let’s give it a shot. If this doesn’t work, then really, I’m just going to have to deal. I don’t have that much longer anyways.”

I smiled for several reasons. Her compliment, like my other patients, was well needed, especially coming from a pregnant woman. I also appreciated her attitude- she felt like she didn’t have that far to go, she could put up with discomfort if she had to. She was 24 weeks and had plenty of time to go. I know so many patients who feel like the last 3-4months are an eternity with their discomforts, and here was this woman who understood the transience of pregnancy and recognized that sometimes we just have to put up with discomfort to simply be pregnant. It was a relief for someone to understand that. I put up with many discomforts during Mabel’s pregnancy- and though I might have mentioned some of them to my providers and friends, I always tried to make the point that I wasn’t complaining, just stating- because really I was just so grateful to be pregnant. Every day I had still pregnant was a gift, considering how high my risk for loss was. Even without that risk, I do truly believe everyday being pregnant is a gift. I just wish some of my patients realized that.

What gets you through the days? Where do you get your validation?